Art

 

Students are taught:

  • a variety of mark making techniques to create shape, details and textures found in the natural world under the theme ‘Coastal’.
  • how to record drawings from first hand still life observation (based around the natural world/sea life) as well as secondary resources (photographs & images).
  • to refer to formal elements, shape, tone, texture, space, composition, line and colour, relief, sculpting in verbal discussion but also explore the key terms in drawing & ceramic lessons based around the theme ‘Coastal’
  • an introduction to surrealism through artists’ work and comparing the different approaches to surrealism.
  • how to apply the relevant formal elements (see key terminology) to artworks and form opinions about contemporary and modern artworks.
  • how to create visual responses to chosen artists using the relevant materials and techniques on offer.

 

Biology

 

Students are taught:

  • ‘cell structure’, ‘ecology’ and ‘photosynthesis
  • ‘respiration’, ‘variation’ and ‘human reproduction’
  • practical applications and skills of the concept covered to help shape their understanding of the scientific method.

 

Chemistry

 

Students are taught:

  • ‘the particle model’, ‘separating mixtures’ and ‘elements and compounds’
  • ‘chemical reactions’, ‘metals and non-metals’ and ‘acids and alkalis
  • practical applications and skills of the concept covered to help shape their understanding of the scientific method.

 

Drama

 

Students are taught:

  • about the true story of the Titanic
  • two plays: A Midsummer Night’s Dream & Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
  • the fictional story of Darkwood Manor
  • to explore the life of the Evacuees during World War Two
  • about the genre of Soap Operas

 

DT

 

Students are taught:

  • how to use a range of equipment across 2 design and technology areas using 2 different themes and contexts which include: TO BE ADDED IN
  • how to generate a wide range of research
  • how to use tools and equipment to progress with practical work
  • a new range of vocabulary related to design and technology

 

English

 

Students are introduced to:

  • the Dystopian genre and explore important dystopian texts from across a wide time scale, from HG Wells, George Orwell and Ray Bradbury to contemporary writers such as Suzanne Collins, Malorie Blackman and Margaret Atwood.
  • the study of Shakespeare at KS3 St Mary’s through exploring either A Midsummer Night’s Dream or The Tempest.
  • the study of 19th century prose through their study of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. (NB very low ability students may study an abridged and simplified version of the text).

 

French

 

Students study the following vocabulary topics:

  • Phonics and the alphabet
  • Introductions and greetings
  • Language for communication in the classroom
  • Numbers
  • Dates (days of the week, months, the dates of key festivals) and ages
  • Classroom items
  • Likes, dislikes and preferences
  • Giving reasons for opinions and preferences
  • Family, pets and descriptions of self and others (people, pets and things)
  • Describing your personality and other people’s personality
  • Review of all previous topics
  • Describing your school, facilities, subjects, uniform, rules, routine/timetable, the canteen and giving reasoned opinions
  • Food
  • Making comparisons between school life in France and the UK
  • Using larger numbers for telling the time
  • Film types and preferences
  • Description and review of a French language film (Le Petit Nicolas)

 

Students study the following cultural topics:

  • Christmas and New Year
  • La Chandeleur
  • Easter in France and French-speaking countries
  • Bastille day

 

Students study the following grammar topics:

  • Gender of nouns and plural forms
  • Negatives
  • Possessive adjectives
  • Present tense of ER/IR/RE verbs including subject pronouns
  • Asking and answering questions (manipulation of verbs/structures)
  • Key irregular verbs in present tense (avoir/être)
  • Commonly used structures (il y a, c’est)
  • Review of all previous grammar
  • Possessive adjectives
  • Agreement of adjectives
  • Use of connectives to develop sentences
  • Key conditional forms
  • Telling the time
  • Modal verbs
  • Partitive article
  • Comparisons/superlatives

 

Geography

 

Students study the following topics from Geography:

  • Weather and climate basics
  • Microclimates fieldwork project
  • Earth History and Tectonics
  • Tectonics data project – mathematics
  • Atlas and Map skills – basic Geographic skills

 

History

 

The students begin with ‘What is History?’ which looks at their previous history knowledge and helps them to understand key terms such as chronology. The students then study the following topics:

  • Roman Empire, looking at the Empire, its army, life in the Roman Empire and legacy of the Roman Empire.
  • Norman Conquest looking at the events of 1066, the use of castles and the first and second baron’s war.
  • Black Death and Peasants Revolt
  • Medieval Life looking at towns, entertainment and punishment
  • Tudors up to Henry VIII looking at the rise of the Tudors, life in the 1500s and Henry VIII and the reformation

 

Maths

 

Students in Key Stage 3 follow a “staged” curriculum. They will study content that is appropriate for their level of ability, initially assigned using data from KS2. As such, a high ability student in year 7 will be studying the same content as a low ability Y9 student. The stages have been taken from a curriculum put together by the external body “kangaroo maths” and adapted to suit our department and students. The content is taken directly from the National Curriculum for Mathematics at Key Stage 3 and involves students being taught to:

 

  • consolidate their numerical and mathematical capability from key stage 2 and extend their understanding of the number system and place value to include decimals, fractions, powers and roots
  • select and use appropriate calculation strategies to solve increasingly complex problems
  • use algebra to generalise the structure of arithmetic, including to formulate mathematical relationships
  • substitute values in expressions, rearrange and simplify expressions, and solve equations
  • move freely between different numerical, algebraic, graphical and diagrammatic representations [for example, equivalent fractions, fractions and decimals, and equations and graphs]
  • develop algebraic and graphical fluency, including understanding linear and simple quadratic functions Mathematics
  • use language and properties precisely to analyse numbers, algebraic expressions, 2-D and 3-D shapes, probability and statistics
  • extend their understanding of the number system; make connections between number relationships, and their algebraic and graphical representations
  • extend and formalise their knowledge of ratio and proportion in working with measures and geometry, and in formulating proportional relations algebraically
  • identify variables and express relations between variables algebraically and graphically
  • make and test conjectures about patterns and relationships; look for proofs or counterexamples
  • begin to reason deductively in geometry, number and algebra, including using geometrical constructions
  • interpret when the structure of a numerical problem requires additive, multiplicative or proportional reasoning
  • explore what can and cannot be inferred in statistical and probabilistic settings, and begin to express their arguments formally

 

Music

 

Students are taught:

  • how composers have used the elements of music to represent the different moods of morning and night in music
  • to develop their awareness and understanding of the elements of music – pitch, tempo, dynamics, duration, attack and decay, texture, timbre and silence which will give pupils the necessary musical vocabulary to allow them to effectively describe different pieces of music at Key Stage 3
  • the importance of pulse as a fundamental upon which music is built and performed
  • to be able to make a clear distinction between pulse and rhythm and to use rhythm grids as a method of recording rhythm patterns

 

PE

 

Students are taught the following units of work on a carousel:

  • Boys: rugby, invasion games, netball, orienteering, gymnastics, badminton, athletics, striking and fielding games.
  • Girls: netball, invasion games, gymnastics, badminton, dance, orienteering, striking and fielding games, athletics.

 

Physics

 

Students are taught:

  • ‘forces and motion’, ‘energy stores’ and ‘thermal energy transfer’
  • ‘waves’, ‘light’ and ‘sound’
  • practical applications and skills of the concept covered to help shape their understanding of the scientific method.

 

RE

 

Students study the following topics from RE:

  • What is belief?
  • What does it mean to be a Christian?
  • Where do beliefs come from?
  • Where do we worship?
  • How do we express faith?
  • What does it mean to be human / human of faith?

 

Spanish

 

Students study the following vocabulary topics:

  • Phonics and the alphabet
  • Introductions and greetings
  • Language for communication in the classroom
  • Numbers
  • Dates (days of the week, months, the dates of key festivals) and ages
  • Classroom items
  • Talking about yourself (where you live/nationality)
  • Describing your family and self, personality,
  • Pets, likes, dislikes, preferences and giving reasoned opinions
  • Peru and general information about Peru and Peruvians
  • Making comparisons between animals in Peru and the UK

 

Students study the following cultural topics:

  • Christmas and New Year
  • Easter in Spain and Spanish -speaking countries
  • San Fermín

 

Students study the following grammar topics:

  • Gender of nouns and plural forms
  • Negatives
  • Possessive adjectives
  • Present tense of AR/ER/IR verbs including subject pronouns
  • Asking and answering questions (manipulation of verbs/structures)
  • Key irregular verbs in present tense (Tener/Ser)
  • Commonly used structures (hay, es/está)
  • Agreement of adjectives
  • Use of connectives to develop sentences
  • Giving opinions
  • Comparisons/superlatives